Tennessee Weather Forum

Weather Forecasting and Discussion => Severe Weather => Topic started by: gcbama on April 15, 2021, 04:00:36 PM

Title: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: gcbama on April 15, 2021, 04:00:36 PM
I know several of us like to discuss past severe weather events quite a bit and I didn't know if there was already a thread for that?

But I thought I would make this one as to not clutter up current weather.

I am also interested if anybody remembers other outbreaks and severe weather events from prior to 1995 ( thats my first real experience here in Tn.)
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: Thundersnow on April 15, 2021, 05:02:55 PM
Maybe it was because I was younger and not as weather aware, but I feel like the region emerged from a quieter period about the mid-1990s. Before that, what comes to mind are the back to back December tornadoes in 1987 and 1988- one in Memphis/West Memphis, and the next in Brentwood/Franklin. There were other outbreaks, I'm sure... but, I'm not thinking of much since the 1970s before that, at least as far as TN is concerned. There were definitely outbreaks in other parts of the country in the 1980s and early 1990s.

EDIT: There was the Germantown tornado in the Memphis area in 1994.... also, a nasty tornado in the Huntsville, AL area in 1989, I think.
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: Bruce on April 15, 2021, 05:53:26 PM
It was the super outbreak of April 74 that all started it for me . I was only 11 , course although did not effect west tennessee because of a overnight Mcs that shunted the instability next day. I will never forget the large mass of the country it effected . From Canada border to nearly gulf coast , just full ef4 and some ef5 tornado s . Unreal
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: gcbama on April 15, 2021, 08:44:36 PM
from what i have seen it does seem the 80's was nowhere near as active as the 90's and 2000's around here.

I have never seen real articles of info on the F2-F3 that went through my town of hohenwald in 1991 ,would love to read up on that...the typical lewis county track is eastern perry county to northern and n/w lewis county, since i have lived here 3 tornadoes of F0 and F1 strength have passed within 2 miles of me...the 2017 supercell was about 500 yards away
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: spanarkle08 on April 16, 2021, 06:28:12 AM
It was the super outbreak of April 74 that all started it for me . I was only 11 , course although did not effect west tennessee because of a overnight Mcs that shunted the instability next day. I will never forget the large mass of the country it effected . From Canada border to nearly gulf coast , just full ef4 and some ef5 tornado s . Unreal

  I was 12 and live in Franklin Co in south middle TN in 74...terrible night for our county and my family....no dorm shelters back them but by summer everyone had one
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: gcbama on April 16, 2021, 08:54:55 AM
something else interesting i have found is, just because a tornado is strong/violent doesn't always lead to it being long track, such as clarksville 1999 , linden 1999 , putnam county last year , all strong to viloent tornadoes with paths less than 10 miles , i found that interesting
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: Thundersnow on April 16, 2021, 09:22:29 AM
something else interesting i have found is, just because a tornado is strong/violent doesn't always lead to it being long track, such as clarksville 1999 , linden 1999 , putnam county last year , all strong to viloent tornadoes with paths less than 10 miles , i found that interesting

On the flip side of that, though, in my observation, long tracks tend to have violent effects for at least a portion of those tracks. Maybe not always, but I don't know of any particularly long tracks for tornadoes that were no worse than EF0 or EF1. Those tend to be short lived.

But, to your point, yes, a short path could be brief but violent.
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: StormNine on April 16, 2021, 04:50:40 PM
On the flip side of that, though, in my observation, long tracks tend to have violent effects for at least a portion of those tracks. Maybe not always, but I don't know of any particularly long tracks for tornadoes that were no worse than EF0 or EF1. Those tend to be short lived.

But, to your point, yes, a short path could be brief but violent.

A longer track below EF-2's would be rare.  Usually, the conditions that favor longer track tornadoes also favor stronger tornadoes.  This is the only fairly long tracked EF-1 tornado that I remember.  The only other way that can happen is that if you had a long tracker that went across an open field but never impacted anything more than grass and wasn't quite strong enough to scour it. 

https://www.weather.gov/pah/jun23severe
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: StormNine on April 17, 2021, 11:24:39 AM
The May 23rd-27th 2000 sequence is a severe weather sequence that although wasn't particularly devastating is quite underrated and mostly forgotten.  It did feature around 15 tornadoes in Middle TN including a few F-2 and a F/EF-3 in Houston County and I remember that timeframe as one of the stormiest times outside of May 2003 and April 2011. I remember passing through Leitchfield, KY, and seeing the tornado damage firsthand about 1-2 weeks after the F-3 tornado hit.   

The most unique thing about the May 2000 setup was that it was predominantly Northwest flow-driven instead of your classic sub-1000 mb low over Missouri/Iowa/Illinois setup.
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: schneitzeit on April 17, 2021, 05:18:19 PM
The closest I have come to experiencing a tornado was in the middle of the night on January 30, 2013. A weak tornado hit Ravenwood High and then moved through our neighborhood.
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: NismoWx on April 17, 2021, 10:43:16 PM
January 24, 1997. Rutherford County F4. We had no idea we were under a Tornado warning. I was 10, playing outside in the front yard and looking over the top of the house to see a cloud "making a circle." That's what I told my mom, who then turned on the TV and heard Bill Hall telling Rutherford County to take cover. It dropped about 3mi away as the crow flies, then evolved into the brief monster it became when it hit Barfield. Twister came out the spring before, and we saw it in theaters. I was OBSESSED with it, so much that I got it for Christmas on VHS, so Mom had a pretty good idea of what I was referring to in the sky.

Good Friday 2009, Boro again. This time, I was on duty at Murfreesboro FD Station 5 on Florence Rd, not far from the intersection of I-24 and 840, watching Lisa Patton track it. The rain hit first, then the hail. The mail carrier came running into the front door, asking if she could shelter with us, as she explained how she had just watched it touch down on the west side of 24. Immediately after that, the power went out, so my Captain and I stepped outside under the front porch. We heard it before we saw it. We watched it cross the interstate, then to our south. His cell phone rang. His wife was at home, and their house had taken a direct hit (west of 24). At this point, we could barely make out the top of it to the SE. Captain left to take care of his house, and as soon as we saw it clear of us, we loaded up and headed SW. We made it to the bridge about the time we were dispatched to our first call. We didn't stop until the next morning.

https://youtu.be/OHuu-ybHG2I

When they show the firefighters, I'm the one in the blue helmet.

That was the day I was no longer excited about tornadoes. I study/watch the weather now so that maybe I can give a friend a heads up.

Sent from my SM-N981U using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: gcbama on April 19, 2021, 08:31:54 AM
January 24, 1997. Rutherford County F4. We had no idea we were under a Tornado warning. I was 10, playing outside in the front yard and looking over the top of the house to see a cloud "making a circle." That's what I told my mom, who then turned on the TV and heard Bill Hall telling Rutherford County to take cover. It dropped about 3mi away as the crow flies, then evolved into the brief monster it became when it hit Barfield. Twister came out the spring before, and we saw it in theaters. I was OBSESSED with it, so much that I got it for Christmas on VHS, so Mom had a pretty good idea of what I was referring to in the sky.

Good Friday 2009, Boro again. This time, I was on duty at Murfreesboro FD Station 5 on Florence Rd, not far from the intersection of I-24 and 840, watching Lisa Patton track it. The rain hit first, then the hail. The mail carrier came running into the front door, asking if she could shelter with us, as she explained how she had just watched it touch down on the west side of 24. Immediately after that, the power went out, so my Captain and I stepped outside under the front porch. We heard it before we saw it. We watched it cross the interstate, then to our south. His cell phone rang. His wife was at home, and their house had taken a direct hit (west of 24). At this point, we could barely make out the top of it to the SE. Captain left to take care of his house, and as soon as we saw it clear of us, we loaded up and headed SW. We made it to the bridge about the time we were dispatched to our first call. We didn't stop until the next morning.

https://youtu.be/OHuu-ybHG2I

When they show the firefighters, I'm the one in the blue helmet.

That was the day I was no longer excited about tornadoes. I study/watch the weather now so that maybe I can give a friend a heads up.

Sent from my SM-N981U using Tapatalk

2009 was scary for sure, I don't think anybody really gets "excited" per say when an event is forecasted, I think it is the adrenaline of nervousness and worry for people and anxiousness to pay attention to the spc and radar all day , i think people get that confused with somebody wishing or hoping for tornadoes maybe?
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: Thundersnow on April 19, 2021, 09:38:44 AM
2009 was scary for sure, I don't think anybody really gets "excited" per say when an event is forecasted, I think it is the adrenaline of nervousness and worry for people and anxiousness to pay attention to the spc and radar all day , i think people get that confused with somebody wishing or hoping for tornadoes maybe?

Make no mistake about it- there are some people who openly hope for outbreaks and are pretty unambiguous about the desire for it to happen. It's a line that can be crossed depending on one's tact, sensitivity, and emotional maturity. Maybe they're just being more honest- I don't know.

I think severe weather fandom is a complex psychology with a lot of nuance. I'll admit to subscribing to the interest in following the development and anatomy of severe weather. I would not be honest if I denied feeling some excitement in a forecast on severe weather days, or an odd appreciation for the appearance of supercells on radar. But, when I for a second think about the human effects, that can quickly turn to dread and sadness. I compare this to a criminal psychologist. The person in that role has an interest in studying cases and perhaps has a professional interest in analyzing a serial killer. They wouldn't be in that career if they didn't. It's not a moral judgment on such a person... just a fascination with the subject and an interest in opportunities to study cases, knowing people have perhaps died or been harmed in the process. But, these studies, driven by a personal interest, have a benefit to society. The same is true of severe weather interest.

Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: gcbama on April 19, 2021, 09:49:46 AM
Make no mistake about it- there are some people who openly hope for outbreaks and are pretty unambiguous about the desire for it to happen. It's a line that can be crossed depending on one's tact, sensitivity, and emotional maturity. Maybe they're just being more honest- I don't know.

I think severe weather fandom is a complex psychology with a lot of nuance. I'll admit to subscribing to the interest in following the development and anatomy of severe weather. I would not be honest if I denied feeling some excitement in a forecast on severe weather days, or an odd appreciation for the appearance of supercells on radar. But, when I for a second think about the human effects, that can quickly turn to dread and sadness. I compare this to a criminal psychologist. The person in that role has an interest in studying cases and perhaps has a professional interest in analyzing a serial killer. They wouldn't be in that career if they didn't. It's not a moral judgment on such a person... just a fascination with the subject and an interest in opportunities to study cases, knowing people have perhaps died or been harmed in the process. But, these studies, driven by a personal interest, have a benefit to society. The same is true of severe weather interest.

that is a great analysis ! I too am fascinated with supercells and tornado outbreaks , pds watches high risks etc. I don't think I am "happy" about it just fascinated, and lets be honest, no meteorologist gets into the business to study the standard 75 degree sunny sky....they get into it to study hurricanes/tornadoes/snow events etc.
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: gcbama on April 19, 2021, 04:59:25 PM
I do have a question....do you consider march 2020 tornado an "outbreak"? I have seen different opinions.

I do not believe it was ,as it was one lone supercell dropping multiple tornadoes ( albeit devastating ones)....to me an outbreak is several supercells producing tornadoes or multiple in a qlcs .... what is everybody else's opinion on this?
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: Bruce on April 19, 2021, 06:49:02 PM
Make no mistake about it- there are some people who openly hope for outbreaks and are pretty unambiguous about the desire for it to happen. It's a line that can be crossed depending on one's tact, sensitivity, and emotional maturity. Maybe they're just being more honest- I don't know.

I think severe weather fandom is a complex psychology with a lot of nuance. I'll admit to subscribing to the interest in following the development and anatomy of severe weather. I would not be honest if I denied feeling some excitement in a forecast on severe weather days, or an odd appreciation for the appearance of supercells on radar. But, when I for a second think about the human effects, that can quickly turn to dread and sadness. I compare this to a criminal psychologist. The person in that role has an interest in studying cases and perhaps has a professional interest in analyzing a serial killer. They wouldn't be in that career if they didn't. It's not a moral judgment on such a person... just a fascination with the subject and an interest in opportunities to study cases, knowing people have perhaps died or been harmed in the process. But, these studies, driven by a personal interest, have a benefit to society. The same is true of severe weather interest.
simply the most exciting weather that exists imo
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: gcbama on April 21, 2021, 08:43:45 AM
I will say as far as excited anxiousness goes, april 2006 and super tuesday were the two events that had me the most nervous.....the forecast buildup  was there for 3 days and the day of we had no crapvection to hinder anything, it was the rare mid state event of having no real inhibiting factors and we were primed on those dates.

March 2012 seemed to be very scary as well as far as anticipation as well as veterans day outbreak and november 2005

Actually Nov 2005 gets overlooked alot for mid state, there were five F2 (strong) tornadoes in mid state that day
Title: Re: Severe Weather Experiences
Post by: StormNine on May 01, 2021, 08:46:13 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EUbA4zquSF8

Check out this Weatherbrains episode. There is quite a bit of information on this episode that is focused on the East Tennessee portion of 4/27.  Some interviews from the NWS of Morristown and meteorologists in Johnson City and Chattanogga.