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Author Topic: Hurricane Ian  (Read 4103 times)

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Offline jwr2914

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Re: Hurricane Ian
« Reply #75 on: September 29, 2022, 10:22:48 PM »
The sheriff of Lee County, FL has been on national media this morning already saying that their county has fatalities in the hundreds from Ian. Time will tell if that's accurate or not, and we can hope it isn't, but it's a terrible sign for what may be coming in the next several days as people can get on site and really identify the casualties.

I do not doubt that is true. Tons of retirement villages were either obliterated or flooded with up to 10 feet of water. A lot of them downplayed it and refused to leave. It did not help that the forecast changed so fast for them.

My aunt runs a cook house at the fairs across the SE with Arnold Amusements. She told me the Red Cross already called her to bring her cook house again. I think she told me she is going to the Punta Gorda area. I might have to use my vacation time and go help out.

My aunt got spared in the Gibsonton (Tampa) area. She said my uncle surrounded her house with his semi trucks that had full trailers. I think he said it was bottled water inside he was contracted to hold by the Shriners. I laughed at first but realize it may not have been that bad of an idea. She had some tiles come off her roof and a bunch of palm trees uprooted, but they made it through. The last I checked they still had no electricity.
Humboldt, TN (Gibson County).

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Offline DocB

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Re: Hurricane Ian
« Reply #76 on: September 30, 2022, 06:51:29 PM »
Having been through numerous hurricanes living in Florida; including Andrew which hit Miami in '92 - I can attest this is a nightmare. The storm surge is nothing to mess with and the risk maps usually are accurate. I feel for the families of those who didn't get out in time.
Make no mistake, there is a long road ahead. Weeks without power will take its toll and the heat and mosquitos are going to be brutal for those doing cleanup. There will be a lot more injuries coming as well as the inexperienced take up chainsaws, step on nails, heart attacks and more. Recovery will come, but that area will be scarred for a decade - at least.

EDIT: This 2:29 video of the 15' storm surge is incredible and to my point.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=al8yTiCVfro   
Report is the house that was washed away was occupied at the time (see them peek out at 0:05) but they did make it out alive.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2022, 07:54:10 PM by DocB »

Offline Bruce

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Re: Hurricane Ian
« Reply #77 on: October 01, 2022, 06:04:21 AM »
Having been through numerous hurricanes living in Florida; including Andrew which hit Miami in '92 - I can attest this is a nightmare. The storm surge is nothing to mess with and the risk maps usually are accurate. I feel for the families of those who didn't get out in time.
Make no mistake, there is a long road ahead. Weeks without power will take its toll and the heat and mosquitos are going to be brutal for those doing cleanup. There will be a lot more injuries coming as well as the inexperienced take up chainsaws, step on nails, heart attacks and more. Recovery will come, but that area will be scarred for a decade - at least.

EDIT: This 2:29 video of the 15' storm surge is incredible and to my point.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=al8yTiCVfro   
Report is the house that was washed away was occupied at the time (see them peek out at 0:05) but they did make it out alive.
they give you 48 plus hour to get out of there evacuate,  beats me why some stay wih a such dangerous storm approaching... just get out of harms way. head more inland at least.
BRING ON SEVERE WEATHER SEASON..

Offline DocB

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Re: Hurricane Ian
« Reply #78 on: October 01, 2022, 07:10:28 AM »
they give you 48 plus hour to get out of there evacuate,  beats me why some stay wih a such dangerous storm approaching... just get out of harms way. head more inland at least.
From my experiences, there are several types:
  • Complacent - too many 'cry wolf' experiences that never amount to much that they underestimate it. I think quite a few thought this storm was going further north
  • Ignorant - they haven't yet experienced what it's like during or in the days after a storm. These are the ones who walk around shell-shocked if they survive.
  • Protective - they know authorities won't let anyone back in for some time and choose to stay to protect property before the storm and from looters after. They usually aren't prepared for days of being on their own however.
  • Hopeful - relying purely on chance that the worst will miss them and if it doesn't - the cavalry will come protect them, but then the cavalry has to move mountains of debris to get to them. These types usually complain the loudest how the government didn't do enough to warn/protect/save them later.
  • Adrenaline junkie - hurricane parties used to be common, now its youtube views. They take the risk for social media credibility.
  • Others - homeless, elderly, mentally ill - these people sometimes are forgotten or just don't have the means to get out, despite massive efforts to move people to shelters.
When I lived there, for every threat we would spend days putting up plywood and galvanized hurricane panels, only to get a glancing blow. Do that enough times and you become complacent. I got to the point where I'd only start preps at Cat 3 or higher. My home was built in 1964 with concrete block and was tough before the building codes got lax in the 70/80's. Hurricane Andrew was a big wake up call for many, myself included.

 

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