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Author Topic: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak  (Read 588 times)

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Offline StormNine

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Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« on: April 29, 2019, 06:28:14 PM »
110 years ago featured one of the deadliest tornado outbreaks in Tennessee's history and probably the most intense record tornado outbreak across the state pre-1950.

1909 was a very rough severe weather year that rivals 1917, 1998, 2008, and 2011 and the setup was favorable for a major outbreak across the Mid-South and surrounding areas. 

Notable tornadoes include a few that split the Memphis Metro with one going north of the city and impacting the Millington and Locke Tennessee.  Another tornado impacted the Covington and Medina areas killing 14.

One of the most vicious tornadoes of the entire outbreak impacted Horn Lake, MS into Whitehaven in Memphis and all the way to Parsons killing 29 people and is said to be a double tornado like the classic photo of one of the Palm Sunday 1965 tornadoes in Indiana.   

Another vicious tornado impacted Bee Springs (Giles County) and into Fayetteville with F-4 damage and at least 29 deaths.   

Areas around Centerville, Nashville, Clarksville, Franklin, and Dickson were also impacted.   

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/exper/outbreaks/#

^^ for maps of this event and others ^^

Meteorologically, this is pretty much your classic tornado situation in Tennessee.  The event featured a 990 to 993mb low that tracked from Northern Missouri to Chicago and a widespread/fat 1000-1500 layer of CAPE.   You also had 50kts of low level shear and most importantly backed or near backed winds to the south at 850mb (lower-level) which likely contributed to a favorable storm mode and prevented storms from running over eachother. 


Post Merge: April 29, 2019, 06:37:49 PM
https://www.weather.gov/ohx/19090429_pulaskicitizen

About the Bee Springs, TN tornado 
« Last Edit: April 29, 2019, 06:37:49 PM by StormNine, Reason: Merged DoublePost »

Offline BRUCE

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #1 on: April 30, 2019, 06:33:27 AM »
110 years ago featured one of the deadliest tornado outbreaks in Tennessee's history and probably the most intense record tornado outbreak across the state pre-1950.

1909 was a very rough severe weather year that rivals 1917, 1998, 2008, and 2011 and the setup was favorable for a major outbreak across the Mid-South and surrounding areas. 

Notable tornadoes include a few that split the Memphis Metro with one going north of the city and impacting the Millington and Locke Tennessee.  Another tornado impacted the Covington and Medina areas killing 14.

One of the most vicious tornadoes of the entire outbreak impacted Horn Lake, MS into Whitehaven in Memphis and all the way to Parsons killing 29 people and is said to be a double tornado like the classic photo of one of the Palm Sunday 1965 tornadoes in Indiana.   

Another vicious tornado impacted Bee Springs (Giles County) and into Fayetteville with F-4 damage and at least 29 deaths.   

Areas around Centerville, Nashville, Clarksville, Franklin, and Dickson were also impacted.   

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/exper/outbreaks/#

^^ for maps of this event and others ^^

Meteorologically, this is pretty much your classic tornado situation in Tennessee.  The event featured a 990 to 993mb low that tracked from Northern Missouri to Chicago and a widespread/fat 1000-1500 layer of CAPE.   You also had 50kts of low level shear and most importantly backed or near backed winds to the south at 850mb (lower-level) which likely contributed to a favorable storm mode and prevented storms from running over eachother. 


Post Merge: April 29, 2019, 06:37:49 PM
https://www.weather.gov/ohx/19090429_pulaskicitizen

About the Bee Springs, TN tornado
read up on that event... it was definitely a classic midsouth tornado 🌪 outbreak...  were way over due for one of these type events...
Come on severe wx season...

Offline schneitzeit

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2019, 07:08:48 AM »
read up on that event... it was definitely a classic midsouth tornado 🌪 outbreak...  were way over due for one of these type events...

It's been a hot minute since we've had very active severe weather in the spring in Tennessee. There was a dash of it in March 2017, but other than that, it has been quiet since the March 2012 "event" that was a huge bust for my area (south of Nashville).

Post Merge: April 30, 2019, 07:12:24 AM
ETA: The April 28, 2014 event brought some strong tornadoes to southern Middle TN, but other than that, this entire decade has been crickets since 4-27-11.
« Last Edit: April 30, 2019, 07:12:24 AM by schneitzeit, Reason: Merged DoublePost »

Offline Eric

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2019, 08:22:55 AM »
It's been a hot minute since we've had very active severe weather in the spring in Tennessee. There was a dash of it in March 2017, but other than that, it has been quiet since the March 2012 "event" that was a huge bust for my area (south of Nashville).

Post Merge: April 30, 2019, 07:12:24 AM
ETA: The April 28, 2014 event brought some strong tornadoes to southern Middle TN, but other than that, this entire decade has been crickets since 4-27-11.

Lets not forget the January 30, 2013 outbreak.  While not a typical "spring time" event, it was (and still is) the largest January outbreak on record.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tornado_outbreak_of_January_29%E2%80%9330,_2013
#tSpotter Coordinator for Rutherford and Montgomery Cos. (@MontCoSevereWx and @RuthSevereWx)

Offline BRUCE

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #4 on: April 30, 2019, 08:37:38 AM »
Lets not forget the January 30, 2013 outbreak.  While not a typical "spring time" event, it was (and still is) the largest January outbreak on record.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tornado_outbreak_of_January_29%E2%80%9330,_2013
imo... the January 1999 outbreak was the most violent outbreak in January records
Come on severe wx season...

Offline JayCee

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #5 on: April 30, 2019, 08:41:45 AM »

Post Merge: April 30, 2019, 07:12:24 AM
ETA: The April 28, 2014 event brought some strong tornadoes to southern Middle TN, but other than that, this entire decade has been crickets since 4-27-11.

After the spring of 2011, I consider the quiet that followed a merciful blessing. 
"For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.." 
Henry David Thoreau

Offline Eric

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #6 on: April 30, 2019, 08:43:04 AM »
imo... the January 1999 outbreak was the most violent outbreak in January records

Most violent, yes, but not greatest in terms of number.
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Offline schneitzeit

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #7 on: April 30, 2019, 09:50:00 AM »
Lets not forget the January 30, 2013 outbreak.  While not a typical "spring time" event, it was (and still is) the largest January outbreak on record.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tornado_outbreak_of_January_29%E2%80%9330,_2013

I remember that! It damaged the roof of my high school! I remember it being 70 degrees at 3am when it hit.

When we got to school that morning, the administration found out a little too late that the classrooms had been damaged and flooded by the rain after the roof was partially torn off. We had to spend most of the day in the auditorium and the gymnasium because some of our classrooms were damaged. Crazy day.

In Brentwood, the same tornado did damage to the roofs of houses, knocked down trees and fences and damaged cars parked outside. I remember seeing the damage when I rode the bus to school in February 2013. The tornado tjrned out to be an EF1.

Post Merge: April 30, 2019, 09:56:05 AM
After the spring of 2011, I consider the quiet that followed a merciful blessing.

Some people don't. Not going to mention any names, Bruce

Post Merge: April 30, 2019, 09:58:05 AM
Link to 1/30/13 tornado damage at Ravenwood HS:
http://www.williamsonherald.com/news/powerful-storm-drives-family-from-home-damages-ravenwood-high/article_3b3896f0-39f5-5813-a043-843d5400ebb1.html
« Last Edit: April 30, 2019, 09:58:05 AM by schneitzeit, Reason: Merged DoublePost »

Offline StormNine

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Re: Remembering: The April 29th 1909 Tornado Outbreak
« Reply #8 on: April 30, 2019, 04:21:21 PM »
I think we tend to go in cycles of more-active versus less-active severe weather and we currently appear to be in a less-active cycle.

We haven't had much since 4/27/2011, but before that, we had a pretty active run starting in 94/95 and running into the early 2010s.  We had the May 1995 and 2003 sequence, 4/16/1998, the January 1999 tornadoes, the April 2006 tornadoes, Super Tuesday 2008, Black Friday 2009, and May 1st-2nd 2010.  That is a very active period.   In our current period, only January 2013 and maybe 12/23/2015 belong on that list.   

Prior to that period, the timeframe between Super Outbreak 74 and the mid 90s was a pretty calm period with a few exceptions in our area.  We have also had historical active periods like the 50s and the 1900s and 1910s.   

 

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