* User

Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length

Advertisement

* Current Watches/Warnings/Advisories for TN - Click the (+) Icon to the Right to see them ------>


Author Topic: Major October Hurricane Michael  (Read 4327 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline JayCee

  • Global Moderator
  • Tornado
  • ******
  • Posts: 2,966
  • Location: East Sevier County
  • Still a wxfreak
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 860
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #165 on: October 12, 2018, 07:13:39 AM »
The images coming from Mexico Beach and surrounding areas are heartbreaking.  Whole neighborhoods are just wiped out.  Massive tracks of pine forests are laid flat.  For those who live there, this has to be devastating.  Such beautiful and undeveloped coastal areas completely destroyed.   
"For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.." 
Henry David Thoreau

Offline cgauxknox

  • Severe Thunderstorm
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
  • Location: Knoxville
  • KM4UMK
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 273
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #166 on: October 12, 2018, 07:23:16 AM »
I caught some of TWC's coverage early this morning and like JayCee said, things are just completely devastated.  The reporters were making the point that the destruction they had on camera was not from surge, but from wind.  The eye wall at landfall was basically a giant EF3 tornado and everything it crossed got destroyed.  That was on the coast of Florida, and friends in Virginia have been posting updates of flooded roads and power outages for the last 24 hours, not to mention the flooding and other problems through the Carolinas, especially western NC from what I've read today.  I don't think anybody could have expected such a massive impact over such a big area, especially in October.

Offline Greyhound

  • Shower
  • **
  • Posts: 60
  • Location: Knoxville, TN
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 123
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #167 on: October 12, 2018, 07:36:07 AM »
Found this weblink of aerial satellite from yesterday.  I've been using it all morning zooming in and checking on structures in Panama City I haven't heard any news about.  As expected, Panama City itself was damaged the most.  While the beach areas did sustain some damage, those areas mostly escaped with minimal damage....or at least what I have been able to tell from the pics.  https://storms.ngs.noaa.gov/storms/michael/index.html#11/30.1534/-85.6027

Also, on 30a.com, they did a live video drive from Watercolor (next to Seaside) all the way to Rosemary Beach yesterday, and it was pretty much damage free.

« Last Edit: October 12, 2018, 10:36:43 AM by Greyhound, Reason: clarification »

Offline Thundersnow

  • Administrator
  • Tornado
  • ******
  • Posts: 10,654
  • Location: Nolensville
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #168 on: October 12, 2018, 08:20:32 AM »
When I was watching the radar of the eye come onshore, it appeared Mexico Beach stayed in the right eye wall as it passed. That area didn't even get the reprieve of the eye itself as the eye tracked in just up the beach toward the base at Tyndall. Maximum winds, maximum surge on that side of the eye. I was afraid for what was happening there, and the images coming out of that area bear this out.

That area isn't as developed with high rises like you see in Destin or PCB. There are a lot of beach house type structures. I've been through that area (many years ago), and it is beautiful, sort of a throwback old style beach town.

Offline Charles L.

  • Global Moderator
  • Tornado
  • ******
  • Posts: 8,856
  • Location: Macon County, TN
  • Twitter:
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 1778
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #169 on: October 12, 2018, 09:08:38 AM »
Thankfully my dadís relative did decide to evacuate to GA Wednesday morning, just hours before landfall.

Good thing too, cause from what they are hearing from others that lived close to them in Mexico Beach say that all the homes in their subdivision (which was 3 blocks from the coast) are completely gone.
Mobile chat link:

http://tennesseewx.com/arrowchat/public/mobile/

SumnerSevereWx and MaconSevereWx #tSpotter Coordinator

Offline Greyhound

  • Shower
  • **
  • Posts: 60
  • Location: Knoxville, TN
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 123
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #170 on: October 12, 2018, 10:38:23 AM »
Saw this on American earlier this morning showing the path of landfall.  It was from a Twitter post and I just did a screen shot of the pic.

Offline Thundersnow

  • Administrator
  • Tornado
  • ******
  • Posts: 10,654
  • Location: Nolensville
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #171 on: October 12, 2018, 11:04:32 AM »
Saw this on American earlier this morning showing the path of landfall.  It was from a Twitter post and I just did a screen shot of the pic.

The crazy thing about that pic (assuming it hasn't been doctored, and I don't assume it has), you can actually make out the path a little out from the shore- presumably debris and stirred up muddy water from the rotation around the eye interacting land and sea.

Offline mempho

  • Tornado
  • ******
  • Posts: 3,634
  • Location: Collierville
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 402
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #172 on: October 12, 2018, 12:34:31 PM »
Napoleonic tactics. (off topic, but since you brought it up). Close range engagement on the battlefield was a holdover from the days of hand to hand combat with swords and bayonets. Introduce firearms into the conflict, and it becomes a much bloodier affair. That was one of the reasons why the Civil War was as bad as it was. Battlefield tactic had to change with technology, but it took a while.

At any rate, your point is taken.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Interesting.  It's just odd that guns were used in the Revolutionary War and noone had figured this out by the Civil War.  Clearly, between the Civil War and WWI, someone figured out the ingenious idea of digging trenches. 


Put on my big snow boots and
I boarded the plane
Touched down in the land of the Delta Blues
In the middle of the freezing rain

Snow up high
Won't you pour down over me
Yeah, I got some accretion
But I'm as blue as a boy can be

Offline Greyhound

  • Shower
  • **
  • Posts: 60
  • Location: Knoxville, TN
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 123
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #173 on: October 12, 2018, 12:34:39 PM »
The crazy thing about that pic (assuming it hasn't been doctored, and I don't assume it has), you can actually make out the path a little out from the shore- presumably debris and stirred up muddy water from the rotation around the eye interacting land and sea.

Wasn't doctored at all...that's what's amazing!!!  They made the same comment you did about the water around the shoreline.  Here's the link to the original post:

https://twitter.com/NWSWPC/status/1050518980925030400

Offline cgauxknox

  • Severe Thunderstorm
  • ****
  • Posts: 465
  • Location: Knoxville
  • KM4UMK
  • Liked:
  • Likes Given: 273
Re: Major October Hurricane Michael
« Reply #174 on: October 12, 2018, 12:51:00 PM »
Interesting.  It's just odd that guns were used in the Revolutionary War and noone had figured this out by the Civil War.  Clearly, between the Civil War and WWI, someone figured out the ingenious idea of digging trenches.
While this is admittedly getting way off topic I'll comment here that this was a case of tactics not keeping pace with technology.  In the Revolutionary War infantry were firing smooth-bore muskets with patch and ball ammunition and your odds of being struck with an aimed shot at 100 yards were relatively small.  In the American Civil War troops were firing minie-balls (named after the developer, and shaped more like a modern bullet than a ball) from rifled barrels with high levels of accuracy.  More accurate fire and more destructive ammunition meant that the same tactics led to massive casualties.

We see this happen throughout history.  Tanks were developed in WW1 because the machine gun made almost every infantry tactic to date obsolete and something had to break the stalemate of trench warfare that was no longer effective because of technology.  In WW2 the biggest change was air power.  Over the past 20 years we've seen an odd mix of technology versus tactics because the nation on nation large scale conflict that everybody had always trained for has, for now, been replaced by what are essentially broad guerrilla wars with small arms and improvised explosives aligned against incredible technical capacity.  Virtually every military in history has been perfectly trained and equipped to fight the previous war.

 

Advertisement