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Author Topic: Spring 2018  (Read 37412 times)

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Offline JayCee

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #465 on: May 10, 2018, 05:49:03 AM »
KMEM holding onto 80 through the 9 o'clock hour.  ::shaking_finger::

Welcome to the dog days in May.

"For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.." 
Henry David Thoreau

Offline Thundersnow

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #466 on: May 10, 2018, 06:32:10 AM »
Thunderstorms moving through here this morning... didn’t expect that.


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Offline JayCee

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #467 on: May 10, 2018, 07:56:52 AM »
Looks like the current line of storms dissipates as it moves east, but a new line of strong storms re-ignites over east TN later this afternoon. 
"For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.." 
Henry David Thoreau

Offline SKEW-TIM

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #468 on: May 10, 2018, 09:30:25 AM »
Looks like the current line of storms dissipates as it moves east, but a new line of strong storms re-ignites over east TN later this afternoon. 
Things look to develop into a MCS Hail producer for us in WNC today....
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Offline Thundersnow

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #469 on: May 10, 2018, 09:47:10 AM »
Looks like the current line of storms dissipates as it moves east, but a new line of strong storms re-ignites over east TN later this afternoon.

Gotta love afternoon heat and humidity working on outflow boundaries.

Post Merge: May 10, 2018, 09:57:14 AM
Confession- I am just as fascinated by a pop-up storm pattern as I am any large scale synoptic setup for winter or severe weather. There's something about the capricious, hard-to-predict nature of these storms that fire up in the humidity, instability, and nuanced features at play in the atmosphere. It's like a game of Russian Roulette- you never know who's going to get one of these storms.

Plus- popup afternoon thunderstorms seem to conjure up fond memories of summer.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2018, 09:58:03 AM by Thundersnow »

Offline cgauxknox

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #470 on: May 10, 2018, 03:29:10 PM »
Plus- popup afternoon thunderstorms seem to conjure up fond memories of summer.
It was definitely a summer feel with the showers and bit of thunder that came through Knoxville earlier.  I'm fighting hard to actually work tomorrow instead of driving east until I find saltwater.  ::yum::

Offline Thundersnow

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #471 on: May 10, 2018, 04:04:35 PM »
Looks like a run of 90s from tomorrow into the first part of next week.


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Offline JayCee

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #472 on: May 10, 2018, 05:34:12 PM »
Gotta love afternoon heat and humidity working on outflow boundaries.

Post Merge: May 10, 2018, 09:57:14 AM
Confession- I am just as fascinated by a pop-up storm pattern as I am any large scale synoptic setup for winter or severe weather. There's something about the capricious, hard-to-predict nature of these storms that fire up in the humidity, instability, and nuanced features at play in the atmosphere. It's like a game of Russian Roulette- you never know who's going to get one of these storms.

Plus- popup afternoon thunderstorms seem to conjure up fond memories of summer.

Agree with you there.  I enjoy watching the cumulus erupt in the late afternoon heat, and hearing the distant growl of thunder afar off, signaling a storm has developed.  I can even tolerate the heat and humidity of mid-summer if it ends with a good hour long thundershow at day's end.  The distant thunder, the darkening skies as the hot air gives way to much cooler breezes, then intense downpours of rain that can only come from convection.  The single cell thunderstorm--one of nature's best shows around.   

Post Merge: May 10, 2018, 06:28:00 PM
Most living near cities with the artificial lighting can't enjoy it, but one of my favorite things to do as a kid was to watch the "heat" lightning late at night as storms very far off approached.  It's not sheet lightning, that is clearly discernable as lighting hidden by clouds or flashing close by.  Heat lightning is barely a flicker of light that seems to come from all around, and can only be seen on a moonless light, and without the light pollution near cities.  Growing up in the 80's in eastern KY, we had the pleasure of enjoying true darkness at night, and one of my favorite pastimes when I knew storms were going to approach overnight was to stay up late and watch the thunder-less flickering of heat lightning in the deep night.  It would sometimes continue for an hour or two until, as the storm neared, the first distant faint rumbles were heard.  Then the heat lightning would become "sheet" lightning along the western horizon--clearly coming from the storm--and the thunder would grow ever louder.  Yeah, it would probably be as boring as watching grass grow for today's generation that has 1001 distractions to keep the mind occupied, but for a young country boy with no video games, I-Phone, or internet, it was fascinating. 

When I think of what I would have to give up to be young again--losing the memories of true country living in the 80's, I'll gladly stay old.  Those memories were the best of my life.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2018, 06:31:54 PM by JayCee »
"For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.." 
Henry David Thoreau

Offline wfrogge

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #473 on: May 11, 2018, 12:12:51 PM »
Say heat lighting one more time.......

Offline BRUCE

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #474 on: May 11, 2018, 02:33:17 PM »
Agree with you there.  I enjoy watching the cumulus erupt in the late afternoon heat, and hearing the distant growl of thunder afar off, signaling a storm has developed.  I can even tolerate the heat and humidity of mid-summer if it ends with a good hour long thundershow at day's end.  The distant thunder, the darkening skies as the hot air gives way to much cooler breezes, then intense downpours of rain that can only come from convection.  The single cell thunderstorm--one of nature's best shows around.   

Post Merge: May 10, 2018, 06:28:00 PM
Most living near cities with the artificial lighting can't enjoy it, but one of my favorite things to do as a kid was to watch the "heat" lightning late at night as storms very far off approached.  It's not sheet lightning, that is clearly discernable as lighting hidden by clouds or flashing close by.  Heat lightning is barely a flicker of light that seems to come from all around, and can only be seen on a moonless light, and without the light pollution near cities.  Growing up in the 80's in eastern KY, we had the pleasure of enjoying true darkness at night, and one of my favorite pastimes when I knew storms were going to approach overnight was to stay up late and watch the thunder-less flickering of heat lightning in the deep night.  It would sometimes continue for an hour or two until, as the storm neared, the first distant faint rumbles were heard.  Then the heat lightning would become "sheet" lightning along the western horizon--clearly coming from the storm--and the thunder would grow ever louder.  Yeah, it would probably be as boring as watching grass grow for today's generation that has 1001 distractions to keep the mind occupied, but for a young country boy with no video games, I-Phone, or internet, it was fascinating. 

When I think of what I would have to give up to be young again--losing the memories of true country living in the 80's, I'll gladly stay old.  Those memories were the best of my life.
you can always stay young.... young at heart ....
Come on severe wx season...

Offline Skillsweather

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #475 on: May 12, 2018, 04:34:38 PM »
So the storms we are going to get later this week are they more like the afternoon spring time storms or is there more to it? Im guessing based on the HPC's rainfall that the storm near florida will help push moisture our way so maybe thats why we will be getting springtime storms or maybe theres another system coming in.
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Offline WXHD

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #476 on: May 12, 2018, 05:22:42 PM »
So the storms we are going to get later this week are they more like the afternoon spring time storms or is there more to it? Im guessing based on the HPC's rainfall that the storm near florida will help push moisture our way so maybe thats why we will be getting springtime storms or maybe theres another system coming in.

I'm seeing 40-50% chance most days, so I think it's afternoon pop ups. I've not looked at the models though.
Earth transforms sunlight's visible light energy into infrared light energy, which leaves Earth slowly because it is absorbed by greenhouse gases. When people produce greenhouse gases, energy leaves Earth even more slowly – raising Earth's temperature. http://www.howglobalwarmingworks.org/

Offline JayCee

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #477 on: May 12, 2018, 07:57:04 PM »
I just hope I get to see some. . .

           HEAT Lightnin!!  >:D
"For many years I was self-appointed inspector of snowstorms and rainstorms, and did my duty faithfully, though I never received one cent for it.." 
Henry David Thoreau

Offline Crockett

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #478 on: May 13, 2018, 07:24:08 PM »
It looks like the next couple of weeks could be potentially wet. The GFS is consistently showing 5-6 inches of rain through Memorial Day (most of it convective, so we'll see just how accurate that turns out to be). A little rain and some relief from the heat will certainly be welcomed, though I hope we don't see another wet and cool pattern develop and outstay its welcome.

I never thought I'd say it but the heat of the last two days was almost ridiculous for this early in the season. It's been plumb scorching!

Offline BRUCE

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Re: Spring 2018
« Reply #479 on: May 13, 2018, 10:27:57 PM »
It looks like the next couple of weeks could be potentially wet. The GFS is consistently showing 5-6 inches of rain through Memorial Day (most of it convective, so we'll see just how accurate that turns out to be). A little rain and some relief from the heat will certainly be welcomed, though I hope we don't see another wet and cool pattern develop and outstay its welcome.

I never thought I'd say it but the heat of the last two days was almost ridiculous for this early in the season. It's been plumb scorching!
come on bro.  Already complaining bout heat ... not even summer yet either....
Come on severe wx season...

 

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